Oct 25 2005

Emura

Emura’s W-Juliet is one of those rare romances (of any type) that features a main couple that, in addition to being attracted to one another, are completely believable as friends. Despite an outw...

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Oct 25 2005

So-Hee Park

So-Hee Park is the author of the excellent Korean manhwa Goong. Goong is an alternate universe story about an ordinary high school girl forced to marry into the Korean royal family. (In Park’s w...

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Oct 24 2005

Yayoi Ogawa

Yayoi Ogawa is the author of three josei mangas: Kimi ha Pet (English title: Tramps Like Us), Candy Life, and Baby Pop. Ogawa’s distinctive art style and truly bizarre romantic pairings have litt...

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Oct 24 2005

Tomoko Hayakawa

Tomoko Hayakawa’s Perfect Girl Evolution (licensed by Del Rey, original Japanese title Yamato Nadeshiko Shichihenge, English title: The Wallflower) is my favorite manga. Picture, if you will, a t...

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Aug 26 2005

Nine Coaches Waiting, by Mary Stewart

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As you all know, we here at Wordcandy are strong believers in the power of cover art. If you want someone to take your book seriously--i.e., shell out big bucks for the hardback version--then you...

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Aug 25 2005

Ngaio Marsh

Ngaio Marsh, one of the four “Great Ladies” of English mystery writing, had a career that spanned approximately fifty years, beginning in 1932 and ending with her death in the 1980s. While her my...

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Aug 25 2005

Farley Mowat

Farley Mowat, author of the Canadian classics Owls in the Family and Never Cry Wolf, is actually quite the figure of controversy in Canada. His detractors (including The Toronto Star) have sugges...

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Aug 25 2005

A. A. Milne

Scottish-born author A. A. Milne is best remembered as the author of the Winnie-the-Pooh books. This delightful series has the distinction of being perhaps the only literary creation that Disney ...

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Aug 25 2005

Andrew Clements

Andrew Clements has written a series of pleasantly earnest, thoughtful children’s books, including the excellent YA sci-fi/fantasy Things Not Seen. Clements spent several years as a teacher, and ...

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Aug 25 2005

Lewis Trondheim

Frenchman Lewis Trondheim is the author of about fifty bazillion comic books, the majority of which are being (slowly) translated into English. His series Dungeon, co-written with Joann Sfar, is ...

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Jul 11 2005

Marjorie Weinman Sharmat

Marjorie Weinman Sharmat's Nate the Great is an amateur detective with a loyal dog, an assortment of weird friends, and a profound (perhaps existential?) hunger for pancakes. He is also the hero ...

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Jul 11 2005

Debi Gliori

Debi Gliori's Pure Dead... series is like an amalgamation of the Artemis Fowl stories, the Addams Family cartoons, and the Series of Unfortunate Events books. Nothing about these books is particu...

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Jul 11 2005

Daphne du Maurier

Daphne du Maurier's major Wordcandy contribution is her gothic suspense novel Rebecca. Rebecca has never been a particular favorite of mine--I've always regarded it as an inferior version of Jane...

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Jul 11 2005

Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier

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(Sorry--this is less a Book of the Week Review than it is book-related musings.) So... have you all been following the completely bizarre courtship of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes? (And if not, you totally should be! May we suggest www.pinkisthenewblog.com as a particularly fine source for TomKat news?) Anyway, in a(nother) vaguely disturbing interview...

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Jul 11 2005

Jean Craighead George

Jean Craighead George has written many interesting, lofty-minded, award-winning novels. Of these, my favorite is My Side of the Mountain, a beautiful story about a young boy who runs away from ho...

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Jul 11 2005

Stephanie Barron

Stephanie Barron is the author of a series of novels featuring Jane Austen as an amateur detective. Ms. Barron's books are structured as Austen's long-lost diaries, recently discovered in an atti...

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Jun 24 2005

George MacDonald

Scottish novelist, poet, and clergyman George MacDonald is the author of a pair of pleasantly Victorian children's classics: The Princess and the Goblin and The Princess and Curdie. While these g...

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Jun 24 2005

Margery Sharp

If the children's books of George MacDonald have "fallen out of fashion", then the books of Margery Sharp are the literary equivalent of the bustle... and I really have no idea why. What happened...

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Jun 24 2005

Karen Hawkins

Much like fellow Wordcandy authors Julia Quinn and Suzanne Enoch, Karen Hawkins is less spectacular than she is consistently entertaining. She has yet to write a novel that knocks my socks off, b...

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Jun 24 2005

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie is the world's most famous mystery writer. She's right up there with the Bible and Shakespeare in terms of sales, you can find her books in 45 different languages, and her most fa...

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Jun 24 2005

Murder on the Orient Express, by Agatha Christie

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Warning: Damning Confession (for a bibliophile) Straight Ahead: I... I have always felt that Agatha Christie's stories make better TV shows than they do books. I know! I'm sorry! Just typing t...

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Jun 24 2005

Dorothy L. Sayers

English mystery novelist and playwright Dorothy L. Sayers understood that what this world really needed was a crime-solving hero that was equal parts Sherlock Holmes and Bertie Wooster. She set o...

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Apr 28 2005

Greensleeves, by Eloise Jarvis McGraw

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My copy of Eloise Jarvis McGraw's Greensleeves is battered, ugly, and features a gigantic stamp on the dust jacket reading "THIS IS NO LONGER THE PROPERTY OF THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY"...

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Apr 24 2005

Shel Silverstein

It was a tremendous blow to readers everywhere when Shel Silverstein died of a heart attack in 1999. Still, like Douglas Adams, Silverstein got an awful lot done during the limited time he spent ...

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Apr 24 2005

Jacqueline Gilbert

Although I can't seem to find out anything on this woman's personal life (I know! Google has failed me!), from the mid-seventies to the early nineties, Jacqueline Gilbert was one of the best auth...

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Apr 24 2005

Eloise Jarvis McGraw

(Information complied with the assistance of Colleen, an University of Oregon reference librarian, and Eric Gjovaag, webmaster of the The Wizard of Oz Info website. Many thanks to both of them!) ...

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Apr 24 2005

John D. Fitzgerald

John D. Fitzgerald's Great Brain stories about Tom, his brilliant and conniving older brother, are a series of charmingly offbeat tall tales. According to Fitzgerald, Tom was the youngest con man...

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Apr 24 2005

Bram Stoker

Bram Stoker was a mediocre Irish playwright and theatrical manager who produced exactly one memorable book: 1897's Dracula. It has been suggested that Stoker's horror story was inspired by a comb...

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Mar 29 2005

Mary Norton

English author Mary Norton was the author of two children's literature classics: the Borrowers series and Bed Knob and Broomstick, which inspired the (...sigh) Disney film of the same name. Norto...

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Mar 29 2005

Laura Zigman

Laura Zigman was one of those authors whose first book, 1998's Animal Husbandry, came out hot on the heels of Helen Fielding's Bridget Jones's Diary, and because it was also a story about a romanc...

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